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How to Do a Testicular Self-Exam in Under Five Minutes

How to Do a Testicular Self-Exam

Basically, the general gist of it is to feel your testicles. But, for those of you who like step-by-step instructions, here you go:
 
  1. Take a bath or shower first. This will relax the scrotal skin and make the whole process easier.
  2. Hold your penis out of the way.
  3. Feel each testicle separately with your thumb and fingers. Roll each one around (gently, of course).
  4. Check for lumps and bumps or changes in size.
 
Things that can feel worrisome but usually aren't:
 
  • One testicle is larger than the other.
  • One testicle hangs slightly lower than the other.
  • A tube-like structure on each of the testicles (this structure is called the epididymis, and its job is to collect and carry sperm).
  • Various blood vessels, supporting tissues, and tubes that are all part of normal anatomy.
 
As you can imagine, it can be tricky to distinguish what different lumps and bumps are and if they're normal or not. This is why it might be a good idea to enlist your doctor's help the first time.
 

What If I Find Something?

Don't spend much time trying to convince yourself it's nothing. That worry will just continue to haunt you in the back of your mind. You might as well make an appointment sooner rather than later. If it's nothing, than you can put your mind at ease. If it's something, you can take care of it sooner.
 
What kind of doctor should you see? It's probably fine to see your regular family doctor. If a specialist is necessary, your family doctor will let you know. Scared about what kinds of tests might be necessary? Generally, if your doctor feels something abnormal, the next step is a scrotal ultrasound, which is fortunately quick and painless. 
 
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