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Types of Hodgkin's Disease

There are five different types of Hodgkin's disease. These types are based on the way the cancer cells look under a microscope, and include:
 
  • Nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease
  • Mixed cellularity Hodgkin's disease
  • Lymphocyte depletion Hodgkin's disease
  • Lymphocyte-rich classical Hodgkin's disease
  • Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease.
     

Symptoms of Hodgkin's Disease

Possible symptoms of Hodgkin's disease include:
 
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Fever
  • Night sweats
  • Weight loss.
     
In adults, the disease may cause these and other symptoms. However, other conditions may cause the same symptoms. See a doctor if any of the following problems do not go away in two weeks:
 
  • Painless, swollen lymph nodes in the neck, underarm, or groin
  • Unexplained fevers
  • Drenching night sweats
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Itchy skin
  • Tiredness or fatigue.
     

Making a Hodgkin's Disease Diagnosis

Doctors use tests that examine the lymph nodes to find and diagnose adult Hodgkin's disease (see Diagnosing Hodgkin's Disease for more information).
 

Treating Hodgkin's Disease

Treatment options for Hodgkin's disease will depend on several factors, such as:
 
  • The type of Hodgkin's disease
  • How fast it is spreading
  • Whether other health issues are present.
 
Treatment options most often involve chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or both. Before beginning treatment, you may want to get a second opinion.
 
(Click Hodgkin's Disease Treatment for more information.)
 
Written by/reviewed by:
Last reviewed by: Arthur Schoenstadt, MD
Last updated/reviewed:
List of references (click here):
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