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What Are Histrelin Implants Used For?

Using Histrelin Implants for Central Precocious Puberty

Central precocious puberty (CPP) is a condition in which puberty starts too early. By definition, children with CPP begin to show signs of puberty before age 8 in girls and age 9 in boys. Signs of puberty may include:
 
  • Breast development and menstruation in girls
  • Penis and testicle growth in boys
  • Pubic and underarm hair growth in boys and girls
  • Acne
  • A sudden growth spurt.
 
Treatment for CPP is aimed at temporarily stopping puberty until a more appropriate time. Without treatment, children with CPP may stop growing at an earlier age than other children, leading to a shorter-than-expected adult height.
 
Your child's healthcare provider will perform tests to look for possible causes of CPP before beginning treatment. Many times, there is no known cause, and medications such as a histrelin implant can be used to effectively treat CPP. If another medical condition, such as a tumor, is causing your child's CPP, treatment for the underlying condition will be necessary.
 

How Does This Medicine Work?

Histrelin implants contain a synthetic (manufactured) form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a naturally occurring hormone in the body. GnRH controls the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary gland (a tiny gland located beneath the brain). LH and FSH stimulate the testes to make testosterone and the ovaries to make estrogen.
 
Histrelin implants work by overstimulating the pituitary gland so it does not make as much LH and FSH. As a result, the testes stop making testosterone and the ovaries stop making estrogen. This temporarily stops puberty in children with central precocious puberty and slows down the growth of prostate cancer cells (which need testosterone to grow and multiply) in men with prostate cancer.
 
Histrelin implants are specially formulated to slowly release medicine into the body for 12 months. After 12 months, the implant must be removed and, if treatment is to continue, a new one inserted.
 
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Histrelin Implant Information

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