Cancer Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Cancer Articles A-Z

Fulvestrant Dosing - Generic Xgeva

This page contains links to eMedTV Cancer Articles containing information on subjects from Fulvestrant Dosing to Generic Xgeva. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Fulvestrant Dosing
    There is only one dose of fulvestrant available for treating breast cancer in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV page explains that fulvestrant dosing is injected once a month as one or two injections. This page also offers tips on taking the drug.
  • Fulvestrant Drug Information
    This eMedTV article gives some basic information on fulvestrant, a drug used to treat a certain type of breast cancer. This Web page also gives guidelines on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment.
  • Gefitinib
    Gefitinib is a drug used to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV page presents an overview of this prescription medicine, including when it is recommended, how it is taken, and what to expect.
  • Gefitinib Dosage
    This eMedTV page examines dosing guidelines for gefitinib, with details on how much you will be prescribed, how often you will take it, and how long treatment will last. A number of helpful tips on how to best use this chemotherapy drug are also included.
  • Gefitinib Drug Information
    Gefitinib is a prescription medication approved to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV Web selection features more information on gefitinib, including how this chemotherapy drug is taken, possible side effects, and more.
  • Gefitinib Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article discusses, gefitinib is known to cause side effects in most of the people who take it. Some of the common reactions, such as diarrhea and nausea, are listed, as are serious problems that require immediate medical treatment.
  • Gefitnib
    Gefitinib is a chemotherapy medicine prescribed for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works and explains what to discuss with your doctor before using it. Gefitnib is a common misspelling of gefitinib.
  • Geftinib
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, gefitinib is a chemotherapy drug prescribed to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This page describes what to discuss with your doctor and lists potential side effects. Geftinib is a common misspelling of gefitinib.
  • Generic Abstral
    As this eMedTV segment explains, there are currently no generic Abstral (fentanyl sublingual tablets) products. This page discusses when a generic version might become available and describes the difference between "generic name" and "generic version."
  • Generic Actiq
    As all of the patents have expired for Actiq (fentanyl lozenge), generic versions of the drug are available. This eMedTV Web article explains how the FDA has determined that these generic products are as good as the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Actiq Lozenges
    There are generic Actiq lozenges available at this time, sold under the name fentanyl lozenges. This eMedTV Web segment further explores these generic lozenges, including details on whether they are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Adcetris
    Biologic drugs, including Adcetris (brentuximab vedotin), are not allowed to be made in generic form. This eMedTV page explains why this is the case and discusses how current legislation may change the laws to allow for generic versions of Adcetris.
  • Generic Alkeran
    There are no generic Alkeran (melphalan) tablets available at this time. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, there are generic versions of Alkeran injections. This article examines the generic availability of this chemotherapy medication.
  • Generic Aloxi
    April 2015 is the earliest possible date that generic Aloxi products could become available in the U.S. This eMedTV Web page offers more detailed information on generic Aloxi and explains the difference between a generic drug and its "generic name."
  • Generic Anzemet
    There are currently no generic Anzemet products available on the market. This eMedTV page looks at why no generic versions are available and explains why dolasetron mesylate is considered the "generic name" and not a generic version of the medication.
  • Generic Aranesp
    There are currently no generic Aranesp products available on the market. This page from the eMedTV archives offers information on why drug companies are not allowed to make generic Aranesp and explains when a generic version may be available.
  • Generic Bexxar
    Currently, no generic Bexxar (tositumomab) products are available, due to certain laws and regulations. This eMedTV page covers why these laws prevent the manufacturing of generic "biologic" drugs, and whether a generic Bexxar might be made in the future.
  • Generic BiCNU
    No company has chosen to make a generic BiCNU (carmustine) product, even though the patents have expired. This eMedTV Web page explores why there are no generic versions available and discusses whether one will become available in the future.
  • Generic Caphosol
    You cannot buy a generic Caphosol product at this time. This eMedTV Web page offers a detailed explanation on why there are not any generic versions of this medicated mouth rinse and discusses what to do if your pharmacy does not carry this product.
  • Generic Caprelsa
    At this time, no generic Caprelsa (vandetanib) products are available. This selection from the eMedTV site discusses why this is the case and explains when a generic version of the medication might be introduced.
  • Generic CeeNU
    No companies are making a generic CeeNU (lomustine) product, even though the patents have expired. This eMedTV segment takes a look at some of the possible reasons for this and discusses the likelihood of a generic becoming available in the future.
  • Generic Cometriq
    Companies are not allowed to make a generic Cometriq (cabozantinib) product at this time. As this eMedTV Web selection explains, however, a generic version of the drug may become available after the patent expires in 2024.
  • Generic Duraclon
    There are currently no generic Duraclon (clonidine) products licensed for sale. This article found in the eMedTV archives explores some of the reasons why no generic manufacturers have chosen to make a generic version of Duraclon.
  • Generic Emend
    As this part of the eMedTV site explains, Emend (aprepitant) is currently not available in generic form. This article talks about why there are no generics on the market and explains when they are likely to be manufactured.
  • Generic Eulexin
    This eMedTV article explains why only generic versions of Eulexin (flutamide) are available. It also describes how the Food and Drug Administration determines how generics compare to brand-name medications and the rating given to generic Eulexin.
  • Generic Fentora
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Fentora (fentanyl buccal tablets). This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at when a generic might become available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Folotyn
    Patents currently prevent generic Folotyn (pralatrexate) from being made in the United States. This eMedTV resource discusses when generic versions might be available. It also defines the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Gliadel
    There are no generic Gliadel (carmustine implant) products currently available. This part of the eMedTV Web site explains whether a generic version might become available. It also discusses ways to afford this expensive brand-name chemotherapy medication.
  • Generic Kyprolis
    No generic Kyprolis (carfilzomib) is available, as the drug is protected by patents and exclusivity rights. This eMedTV page offers a discussion on when the first patent is expected to expire and when a generic version of the drug might become available.
  • Generic Kytril
    Kytril (granisetron) is currently available in generic form. This selection from the eMedTV archives provides more information on this topic, including a discussion on the different forms of generic Kytril and some of the manufacturers who produce it.
  • Generic Lazanda
    At this time, there are no generic Lazanda (fentanyl nasal spray) products available. This eMedTV page explores when a generic version might become available and covers why fentanyl is considered a generic name rather than a generic version of the drug.
  • Generic Marinol
    This eMedTV segment explains that because the patent for brand-name Marinol has expired, a generic version is now available. Two different companies make this medication: one version is considered an "authorized generic"; the other has an "AB" rating.
  • Generic Mutamycin
    As this eMedTV resource explains, only generic Mutamycin (mitomycin) products are currently available. This page presents more details on this topic, including available strengths and information on whether the generic versions are as good as Mutamycin.
  • Generic Myleran
    It is not known when, or even if, a generic Myleran (busulfan) product will become available. This eMedTV article discusses why no companies have made a generic version of the drug yet. It also explains why busulfan is not the same as a generic Myleran.
  • Generic Name for Fentora
    As this eMedTV page explains, Fentora's generic name is "fentanyl buccal tablet" (not to be confused with a generic version of the drug). This page further explains that Fentora is currently not available as a generic and offers a link to more details.
  • Generic Neulasta
    At this time, Neulasta is not available in generic form. As this article from the eMedTV archives explains, Neulasta is currently under a certain set of laws and rules that prevents any generic Neulasta products from being manufactured.
  • Generic Neupogen
    Generic Neupogen is currently not available on the market. This article from the eMedTV library discusses why generic Neupogen products are not allowed to be manufactured and explains when a generic version of the drug might be available.
  • Generic Nolvadex
    Generic Nolvadex has been available since the manufacturer stopped making the brand-name version. This eMedTV Web page provides a detailed overview on the drug, including companies who produce it and an explanation of how the FDA rates generic drugs.
  • Generic Nucynta ER
    This eMedTV resource explains that because Nucynta ER (tapentadol ER) is a relatively new medication, it may be a while before a generic version is available. This article further discusses when a generic Nucynta ER might become available.
  • Generic Onsolis
    There are no generic Onsolis (fentanyl buccal soluble film) products available at this time. This page of the eMedTV Web library discusses why this is the case and explains when a generic version of this medication might become available.
  • Generic Ontak
    "Biologic" drugs, including Ontak (denileukin diftitox), are not allowed to be manufactured in generic form. This eMedTV page explains why generic versions of biologic drugs are prohibited and discusses if a generic Ontak might be available in the future.
  • Generic Procrit
    Generic "biologic" medicines, including generic Procrit, are not allowed to be manufactured at this time. This eMedTV resource explains why there are currently no generic Procrit products and discusses when they may become available.
  • Generic Revlimid
    At this time, no generic versions of Revlimid (lenalidomide) are available. This eMedTV Web selection explains when a generic version of this drug might be introduced and lists some circumstances that may delay this date.
  • Generic Sancuso
    This eMedTV page explains that there are currently no generic Sancuso (granisetron transdermal) products. This page explains when a generic may become available and discusses the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic SUTENT
    There is currently no generic SUTENT (sunitinib) available. This eMedTV segment discusses when this situation might change and explains why sunitinib is considered the "generic name" and not a generic version of the medication.
  • Generic Temodar
    At this time, generic Temodar (temozolomide) is available. However, as explained in this eMedTV article, not all types of Temodar come in generic form. This article also explains how the generic version compares to brand-name Temodar.
  • Generic Trexall
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV archives, there are no patents protecting brand-name Trexall (methotrexate) from generic competition; however, no generic versions are available. This article also explores the use of generic methotrexate tablets.
  • Generic Velcade
    You cannot buy a generic Velcade (bortezomib) at this time. This selection from the eMedTV Web library contains an explanation of when a generic version of this drug might be introduced and describes some of the situations that may delay this date.
  • Generic Vincasar PFS
    As this eMedTV article explains, Vincasar PFS (vincristine) is a generic version of Oncovin. This resource explains why this generic medication has a brand name, and discusses whether there are other similar generic products available.
  • Generic Xgeva
    The current laws do not allow companies to make a generic Xgeva product. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at why Xgeva is considered a biologic medication and whether a generic version of the medication might become available someday.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.