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Adult Zofran Dosage - Aranesp and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Cancer Articles containing information on subjects from Adult Zofran Dosage to Aranesp and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Adult Zofran Dosage
    The usual adult dosage of Zofran for high-risk chemotherapy is 24 mg, taken 30 minutes before chemotherapy. This eMedTV segment also provides Zofran dosing guidelines for preventing postoperative and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting.
  • Adverse Reaction Can Last Several Days From Oxaliplatin
    This eMedTV article explains that if you develop nerve problems with oxaliplatin, it can take several days, months, or longer before the adverse reactions will resolve completely. This page explores this topic and contains a link to more details.
  • Aim for Ease
    There will be days when you are stuck at doctors' appointments or chemo sessions until late in the afternoon, and you probably won't have the energy or time to cook a from-scratch meal. Be prepared with ready-to-go options, such as frozen dinners, canned soup, canned tuna, peanut butter, and other options that you can use to throw together quick but satisfying meals.
  • Aldesleukin
    Aldesleukin is a prescription medicine licensed to treat certain skin and kidney cancers. This page of the eMedTV Web site presents more detailed information on this chemotherapy drug, including how it works, dosing instructions, safety issues, and more.
  • Aldesleukin Dosage
    A healthcare provider will inject aldesleukin slowly into a vein (intravenously). This part of the eMedTV Web site gives an in-depth look at dosing guidelines for aldesleukin, including how your dosage is determined and how long treatment will last.
  • Aldesleukin Drug Information
    Adults with skin or kidney cancer may receive a drug called aldesleukin. More information is included in this eMedTV page, including how this chemotherapy medicine works and why it may not be safe for some people. A link to more details is also included.
  • Aldesleukin Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article explains, people receiving aldesleukin may develop some type of reaction, such as chills, diarrhea, or nausea. This page describes other possible aldesleukin side effects, including those that require immediate medical treatment.
  • Aldesleukin Type of Drug
    A doctor may prescribe aldesleukin to help treat skin or kidney cancer. This eMedTV article explains how this type of immunotherapy drug works to help fight these forms of cancer. It also links to more details on side effects, safety issues, and more.
  • Alemtuzimab
    A person with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia may be given alemtuzumab as part of their treatment plan. This eMedTV page provides a brief description of this drug, with a link to more information. Alemtuzimab is a common misspelling of alemtuzumab.
  • Alemtuzumab
    This eMedTV page provides a detailed overview of alemtuzumab, a medication used for a specific type of leukemia. This article explains how this prescription drug works, lists possible side effects, discusses generic availability, and more.
  • Alemtuzumab and Multiple Sclerosis
    When a person is given alemtuzumab for multiple sclerosis, this is an "off-label" use. This segment of the eMedTV archives discusses this use of the drug, with information on how it works for its primary purpose and what the phrase off-label means.
  • Alemtuzumab Dosage
    This selection of the eMedTV library provides detailed dosing information for alemtuzumab, including how the dose is small to start and gradually increased to the recommended amount. Tips to ensure a safe, effective treatment process are also provided.
  • Alemtuzumab Drug Information
    This segment of the eMedTV library provides some important information on alemtuzumab, a drug used to treat a specific kind of leukemia. This article explains how this medicine works and what to discuss with the healthcare provider prescribing it.
  • Alemtuzumab Side Effects
    This eMedTV page explains that the most common alemtuzumab side effect in clinical studies was low white blood cell counts (up to 97 percent). This article takes a look at other possible reactions, including those requiring prompt medical care.
  • Alkeran
    Alkeran is a chemotherapy drug licensed to help relieve symptoms of multiple myeloma and ovarian cancer. This eMedTV page contains more details on this prescription drug, with information on how it works, available strengths, and potential side effects.
  • Alkeran 2 Mg
    As this eMedTV page explains, Alkeran tablets come in one strength: 2 mg. This article provides information on the types of cancer Alkeran can treat. This resource also discusses the injectable form of the drug and offers a link to more details.
  • Alkeran and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, women are generally advised to not breastfeed while using Alkeran (melphalan), due to potentially serious reactions that might occur in a nursing infant. This page examines the potential problems that could occur.
  • Alkeran and Pregnancy
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Alkeran (melphalan) is generally not recommended during pregnancy. This page takes a closer look at this topic and stresses the importance of using an effective form of birth control during treatment.
  • Alkeran Chemotherapy Information
    As this eMedTV article explains, Alkeran is a medication used to treat certain types of cancer. This Web page gives a brief overview of Alkeran, with information on how this chemotherapy drug is given, what to discuss with your doctor, and more.
  • Alkeran Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, your Alkeran dosage is calculated using your height and weight, as well as other factors. This article presents details on how this chemotherapy drug is given and how long treatment will last.
  • Alkeran Drug Interactions
    It may not be safe to take certain herbal supplements or other products with Alkeran. This eMedTV page examines how drug interactions with Alkeran can cause potentially serious complications. It also discusses how to avoid these problems.
  • Alkeran Overdose
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses how an overdose of Alkeran (melphalan) may cause potentially life-threatening problems. This resource lists possible effects of an overdose and explains how these symptoms may be treated.
  • Alkeran Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, possible Alkeran side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and infertility. This article provides a more in-depth list of reactions to this chemotherapy drug, including those that require immediate treatment.
  • Alkeran Tablets
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Alkeran comes as tablets or intravenous injections that are used to treat multiple myeloma or ovarian cancer. This page explains when this drug is prescribed and includes a link to more details.
  • Alkeran Uses
    Alkeran is prescribed to relieve symptoms caused by multiple myeloma or ovarian cancer in adults. This eMedTV article presents details on what Alkeran is used for, how it works to prevent cancer cells from dividing, and whether it's safe for older adults.
  • Alkeran Warnings and Precautions
    Some people may have a higher risk for complications like infections or anemia while using Alkeran. This eMedTV resource explores safety precautions to be aware of with Alkeran, including warnings of serious and even fatal complications that may occur.
  • Alkoran
    Alkeran is a chemotherapy drug prescribed to treat ovarian cancer or multiple myeloma in adults. This eMedTV article examines this product, including when it is prescribed, how it is given, and how it works. Alkoran is a common misspelling of Alkeran.
  • Allergic Reaction to Oxaliplatin
    A rash, shortness of breath, and other allergic reactions can occur during oxaliplatin treatment. This eMedTV segment lists some signs of potentially dangerous allergic reactions that can occur, and provides a link to more details on other side effects.
  • Aloxi
    Aloxi is a medicine that helps prevent nausea and vomiting that is caused by chemotherapy or surgery. This eMedTV resource further explains how it works, offers dosing information for the drug, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Aloxi and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Aloxi recommends avoiding breastfeeding while taking the drug. As this eMedTV article explains, since no studies have been conducted on Aloxi and breastfeeding, it is not known whether the medicine passes through breast milk.
  • Aloxi and Pregnancy
    Aloxi appears to be safe for temporary or short-term use during pregnancy. As this eMedTV page explains, animal studies on Aloxi and pregnancy show that the drug did not cause any problems when it was given in high doses to pregnant rabbits and rats.
  • Aloxi Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, when used to prevent nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy, the recommended injectable Aloxi dosage is 0.25 mg. This page also gives the dosage for preventing surgery-related nausea and vomiting.
  • Aloxi Drug Information
    Aloxi, a medication used for nausea and vomiting, was once available by injection only. However, as this eMedTV page explains, it's now also available in capsule form. This article gives some basic drug information on Aloxi and its uses.
  • Aloxi Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article explains that while it was once thought that there were several drugs that would interact with Aloxi, it is now believed that Aloxi drug interactions are unlikely. This segment talks about why this is the case.
  • Aloxi Side Effects
    Common Aloxi side effects include diarrhea, weakness, constipation, and headache. This eMedTV segment also lists rare but possible side effects of the drug, as well as potentially serious side effects that should be reported to a doctor right away.
  • Aloxi Uses
    Aloxi is used for the prevention of nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy or surgery. This eMedTV Web page explains whether the medication can be used in children and lists possible "off-label" Aloxi uses.
  • Aloxi Warnings and Precautions
    Aloxi shouldn't be taken by those who are allergic to Aloxi or palonosetron hydrochloride. This eMedTV page gives other Aloxi warnings and precautions, including a list of medical conditions to tell your doctor about before starting Aloxi.
  • Alternative Bladder Cancer Treatment
    As this eMedTV selection explains, alternative treatments for bladder cancer may include acupuncture, massage therapy, herbal products, and vitamins. This article offers an in-depth look at these and other alternative treatment options.
  • Alternative Brain Cancer Treatment
    Alternative options for brain cancer methods may interfere with standard treatment. Therefore, as this eMedTV article explains, discuss alternative brain cancer treatment methods like vitamins or herbal products with your doctor before using them.
  • Alternative Cancer Treatment
    Imagery, meditation, and biofeedback are just some examples of alternative cancer treatments. This eMedTV page examines other alternative treatments people with cancer can use, in addition to medical therapies, to reduce stress and side effects.
  • Alternative Kidney Cancer Treatment
    Acupuncture, massage therapy, and vitamins are aspects of alternative kidney cancer treatment. This eMedTV article discusses these and other options that may help people with kidney cancer reduce stress, manage symptoms, and minimize side effects.
  • Alternative Multiple Myeloma Treatment
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, acupuncture, massage therapy, and vitamins are a few of the alternative multiple myeloma treatments some people try. This article discusses these and other alternative treatments for multiple myeloma.
  • Alternative Stomach Cancer Treatment
    As this eMedTV page explains, alternative treatment options for stomach cancer include such things as acupuncture, vitamins, and herbal products. This article discusses these and other alternative treatments and includes questions to ask the doctor.
  • Alternative Testicular Cancer Treatment
    As this eMedTV segment explains, alternative testicular cancer treatment (such as acupuncture, meditation, and massage) may help those coping with disease. This article takes an in-depth look at alternative cancer treatments.
  • Alternative Treatment for Thyroid Cancer
    People often find that alternative thyroid cancer treatments help reduce stress and minimize side effects. This eMedTV resource discusses some alternative ways to treat this disease and includes a list of questions to ask your doctor about such methods.
  • Alternative Treatments for Liver Cancer
    For people living with liver cancer, alternative treatments may help in dealing with stress and pain. This eMedTV article discusses alternative treatments for this disease, including acupuncture, massage therapy, vitamins, and herbal products.
  • Alternatives to ERCP With Balloon Dilation and Stent Placement
    This video clip describes possible alternatives to ERCP.
  • Alternatives to Laparascopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy
    This video explains that there are alternatives to a hysterectomy for certain conditions.
  • Alternatives to LAVH For Abnormal Uterine Bleeding
    This video describes various treatment options available for abnormal uterine bleeding.
  • Alternatives to LAVH For Chronic Pelvic Pain
    This interactive video provides information on what to do for chronic pelvic pain.
  • Alternatives to LAVH For Endometriosis
    This clip describes the various medicines and surgeries that are useful for endometriosis.
  • Alternatives to LAVH For Fibroids
    This multimedia clip describes various treatment options that are available for fibroids.
  • Alternatives to LAVH For Pelvic Relaxation
    This video file offers relaxation tips to help the muscles and ligaments in your pelvis.
  • Alternatives to LAVH For Precancerous and Cancerous Lesions
    This clip explains what procedures can be done to treat precancerous and cancerous growths.
  • Altretamine
    Altretamine is approved to help minimize symptoms caused by ovarian cancer. This eMedTV segment features a comprehensive look at this prescription drug, including how to take it, how it works, potential side effects, and more.
  • Altretamine Dosage
    Altretamine comes as capsules that are taken four times daily. This eMedTV resource examines specific altretamine dosing guidelines, including details on how your healthcare provider will determine your dosage and how long treatment lasts.
  • Altretamine Drug Information
    Altretamine is not a cure for ovarian cancer, but it can help minimize symptoms of this disease. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at altretamine, with information on how to take this chemotherapy drug, side effects, and more.
  • Altretamine Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article discusses, most people who use altretamine will experience some type of side effect, such as nausea, fatigue, or vomiting. Other potential problems are listed, as well as details on what to do if serious reactions occur.
  • Anastrazole
    Anastrozole is a prescription drug used to treat certain types of breast cancer. This page on the eMedTV Web site briefly describes the drug's uses and dosing. Common side effects are also listed. Anastrazole is a common misspelling of anastrozole.
  • Anastrozole
    Anastrozole is a medication licensed to treat postmenopausal women with certain types of breast cancer. This eMedTV page offers a detailed look at the prescription drug, including how it works, when it is used, dosing information, and side effects.
  • Anastrozole (Arimidex)
    Certain types of breast cancer can be treated with anastrozole (Arimidex). This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at this prescription medication, including a list of potential side effects. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Anastrozole Dosing
    Anastrozole dosing guidelines generally call for 1 mg a day when treating breast cancer. However, as this eMedTV article explains, the stage of the cancer can affect this. Helpful tips for those taking the medication are also provided.
  • Anemia
    Chemotherapy often slows down the bone marrow's ability to make blood cells, including red blood cells. If you don't have enough red blood cells, you become anemic. Because red blood cells carry oxygen throughout your body, you may develop symptoms such as fatigue, faintness, weakness, and a rapidly or forcefully beating heart.
  • Anesthesia Choices For Laparascopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy
    This video clip discusses the type of anesthesia you may be given and risks to consider.
  • Angiogenesis
    As this eMedTV page explains, angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels. This process plays an important part in the growth and spread of cancer. This article discusses the process in more detail and describes the research aimed at stopping it.
  • Ansmet
    Anzemet is a prescription drug licensed for nausea and vomiting caused by surgery or chemotherapy. This eMedTV article describes how Anzemet works and explains when and how to take the drug. Ansmet is a common misspelling of Anzemet.
  • Anzamet
    Anzemet is a medicine that is used to prevent nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy or surgery. This eMedTV segment explains when and how to take Anzemet and links to more detailed information on the drug. Anzamet is a common misspelling of Anzemet.
  • Anzemet
    Anzemet is a medicine that is prescribed for nausea and vomiting caused by surgery and chemotherapy. This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of this drug, including its effects, dosing information, and possible side effects.
  • Anzemet and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Anzemet is safe for breastfeeding women. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Anzemet and breastfeeding, and explains why no clinical studies have been conducted on the safety of the drug in breastfeeding women.
  • Anzemet and Pregnancy
    Anzemet seems to be safe for temporary use in pregnancy, but it is not recommended for long-term use. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on the clinical studies that have been conducted on Anzemet and pregnancy.
  • Anzemet Dosage
    When used to prevent nausea and vomiting due to surgery, Anzemet is given by IV. This eMedTV page also offers Anzemet dosage recommendations for the prevention of nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy and includes tips for taking the drug.
  • Anzemet Drug Interactions
    Amoxapine, methadone, and rifampin are medications that may cause Anzemet drug interactions. This eMedTV article lists other medicines that may cause Anzemet interactions and explains the risk of developing QT prolongation during a drug interaction.
  • Anzemet for Chemotherapy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Anzemet is used for the prevention of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting. This article describes how Anzemet performed in clinical trials and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Anzemet Overdose
    In one Anzemet overdose case, the patient experienced dizziness, low blood pressure, and arrhythmia. This eMedTV article explains how common Anzemet overdoses are and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Anzemet Side Effects
    Fever, fatigue, and dizziness are some of the most common side effects of Anzemet. Side effects, as this eMedTV article explains, are generally minor, but you should contact your doctor if you develop arrhythmia, chest pain, or allergic reactions.
  • Anzemet Uses
    Anzemet is used for nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy or surgery. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting, and discusses possible "off-label" Anzemet uses.
  • Anzemet Warnings and Precautions
    Anzemet may potentially cause a dangerous irregular heart rhythm called QT prolongation. This eMedTV page contains other Anzemet warnings and precautions, including important information on who should not take the medication.
  • Appetite Changes
    Good nutrition is important during cancer treatment, but unfortunately, chemotherapy sometimes gets in the way of good nutrition. Most people are aware of the nausea and vomiting chemotherapy can cause (although these side effects can be largely avoided or controlled), but there are also other ways that chemo interferes with your appetite. Sometimes mouth sores make eating painful, and sometimes medications ruin the taste of food for you.
  • Aranesp
    Aranesp is a medicine that can be prescribed to treat anemia due to chronic kidney failure or chemotherapy. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of Aranesp, explains how and when to take the drug, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Aranesp and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether it is safe to breastfeed while taking Aranesp. This article from the eMedTV library offers more information on Aranesp and breastfeeding, and explains why the medication is not likely to pass through breast milk.
  • Aranesp and Pregnancy
    When given to pregnant rats, Aranesp increased the risk of miscarriages and low birth weight. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Aranesp and pregnancy, and discusses the possible risks of using the drug while pregnant.
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