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Onsolis Side Effects - Pancreatic Cancer Nutrition

This page contains links to eMedTV Cancer Articles containing information on subjects from Onsolis Side Effects to Pancreatic Cancer Nutrition. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Onsolis Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported Onsolis side effects include nausea, weakness, and vomiting. This eMedTV page gives an overview of possible side effects, listing common ones as well as potentially serious reactions that may require medical care.
  • Onsolis Storage and Disposal
    As this eMedTV resource explains, keep Onsolis (fentanyl buccal soluble film) in a safe place and flush any unused medicine down the toilet. This page further discusses proper Onsolis disposal and storage methods on how to safely handle this drug.
  • Onsolis Uses
    If you have breakthrough cancer pain, your healthcare provider may prescribe Onsolis. This page from the eMedTV Web library further discusses what Onsolis is used for, how to obtain it, and how this medicine works to relieve cancer pain.
  • Onsolis Warnings and Precautions
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, you may not be able to use Onsolis if you have certain conditions, such as lung disease. This article lists other Onsolis warnings and precautions to be aware of before using this pain medication.
  • Onsolis Withdrawal
    Stopping Onsolis (fentanyl buccal soluble film) too quickly can cause withdrawal symptoms. This eMedTV Web resource provides a detailed list of possible Onsolis withdrawal symptoms and explains how your healthcare provider can help you avoid them.
  • Ontack
    As this eMedTV resource explains, adults who have cutaneous T-cell lymphoma may benefit from treatment with Ontak. This page describes how this drug is given, how it works, and potential side effects. Ontack is a common misspelling of Ontak.
  • Ontak
    As a type of chemotherapy drug, Ontak is approved for treating certain types of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This eMedTV resource features an overview of this medicine, including possible side effects, dosing information, and links to more details.
  • Ontak and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV article addresses the question of whether Ontak (denileukin diftitox) is safe for use while breastfeeding. This resource discusses why it is unknown whether the drug passes through breast milk and what the manufacturer recommends.
  • Ontak and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, women should only receive Ontak (denileukin diftitox) during pregnancy if it is absolutely necessary. This article explores the risks of using this drug when pregnant and what your healthcare provider may advise.
  • Ontak Dosage
    Ontak will be administered by your doctor once a day for five days in a row, once every three weeks. This eMedTV segment describes how your healthcare provider will calculate your individual Ontak dosage and explains what to expect during treatment.
  • Ontak Drug Interactions
    Your doctor needs to be aware of any other medicines or supplements you are taking before you can use Ontak. This eMedTV Web page features a detailed list of products, such as vaccines and herbal supplements, that can cause drug interactions with Ontak.
  • Ontak Drug Storage
    As this eMedTV resource explains, after removing Ontak from storage in the freezer, the drug is brought to room temperature and injected slowly into a vein by your healthcare provider. This page covers more dosing information and links to more details.
  • Ontak Medication Information
    Ontak is prescribed to treat a specific type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in adults. This selection from the eMedTV site contains basic information on Ontak, including how this medication works and how it is given. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Ontak Overdose
    Receiving too much Ontak (denileukin diftitox) may cause vomiting, chills, and other problems. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible overdose effects and explains why an overdose on this chemotherapy drug is generally unlikely to occur.
  • Ontak Side Effects
    Most people undergoing treatment with Ontak will develop some type of reaction to this chemotherapy drug. This eMedTV article lists the most common Ontak side effects reported during clinical studies, as well as potentially serious problems.
  • Ontak Uses
    Ontak is prescribed to help kill certain cancer cells on the skin caused by cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This eMedTV segment examines how this chemotherapy drug works and whether it is safe for use in children. Off-label uses for Ontak are also listed.
  • Ontak Warnings and Precautions
    People with low blood levels of albumin may not be able to use Ontak. Other safety precautions are listed in this eMedTV article, including warnings for people with a history of certain medical problems and those who are using certain medications.
  • Ontek
    Ontak is licensed for the treatment of a certain type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This page of the eMedTV Web site gives a brief overview of this prescription drug and offers a link to more information. Ontek is a common misspelling of Ontak.
  • Oxaliplatin
    Oxaliplatin is a drug prescribed to treat cancer that affects the colon or rectum. This page from the eMedTV Web library presents an overview of this medication, with details on how it is administered, how it works, potential side effects, and more.
  • Oxaliplatin 100 Mg
    After taking several factors into consideration, your doctor may prescribe an oxaliplatin dosage of 100 mg. This eMedTV segment describes the factors that may affect your dose, explains how the drug works, and covers some of the potential side effects.
  • Oxaliplatin and Asthma
    If you have asthma, oxaliplatin may not be the most appropriate chemotherapy drug for you. This eMedTV Web page takes a look at how some people using this medication developed lung disease. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Oxaliplatin and Cancer
    A doctor may prescribe oxaliplatin to treat cancer of the colon or rectum. This page of the eMedTV Web library offers a brief look at this chemotherapy drug and how it works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Oxaliplatin and Cold Sensitivity
    People using oxaliplatin may develop nerve problems like sensitivity to cold temperatures or objects. This eMedTV Web page explains how to help minimize some of this cold sensitivity caused by oxaliplatin, and offers a link to more details.
  • Oxaliplatin and Ice Chips
    As this eMedTV segment explains, you may need to avoid cold beverages and ice chips if you are receiving oxaliplatin and develop nerve problems like sensitivity to cold temperatures. This page explores this topic and offers a link to more details.
  • Oxaliplatin Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, oxaliplatin is injected slowly into a vein (intravenously) to treat certain types of colon or rectal cancer. This article focuses on specific dosing guidelines for oxaliplatin, including when and how it is given.
  • Oxaliplatin in Older Patients
    Although older patients can use oxaliplatin, they may have an increased risk for side effects. This eMedTV resource outlines some of those possible reactions, such as diarrhea and dehydration. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Oxaliplatin Injection
    As explained in this eMedTV article, oxaliplatin comes as an injection that is administered intravenously (by IV) every two weeks. This page discusses what to expect while receiving this drug, and offers a link to more details.
  • Oxaliplatin Medication Information
    As explained in this eMedTV page, adults with certain types of colon or rectal cancer may be able to slow down the progression of the cancer with oxaliplatin. This page offers more information on this medication and includes a link to more details.
  • Oxaliplatin Neuropathy
    A majority of the people who receive oxaliplatin will develop some type of neuropathy (nerve problem). This eMedTV segment examines some of the forms of neuropathy that can occur, including a list of some of the possible signs of these nerve problems.
  • Oxaliplatin Side Effects
    People receiving oxaliplatin are likely to experience some type of side effect, such as nausea or vomiting. This eMedTV Web page examines other possible side effects of this drug, including some of the potentially serious problems that require treatment.
  • Oxaliplatine
    As this eMedTV page explains, adults with colon or rectal cancer may benefit from treatment with oxaliplatin. This page describes how the drug is given and lists some potential side effects. Oxaliplatine is a common misspelling of oxaliplatin.
  • Oxalplatin
    A doctor may prescribe oxaliplatin to treat certain types of colon or rectal cancer in adults. This eMedTV resource explores this chemotherapy drug, including how it works and potential side effects. Oxalplatin is a common misspelling of oxaliplatin.
  • Oxymorphone ER
    Oxymorphone ER is a type of opioid narcotic prescribed to treat long-term, continuous pain. This eMedTV page gives a comprehensive overview of this prescription medication, including its effects, dosing instructions, possible side effects, and more.
  • Oxymorphone ER Dosage
    Your doctor will take several factors into account when determining your oxymorphone ER dosage. This eMedTV page offers an explanation of some of these considerations that may affect your dose and lists important tips for taking this drug safely.
  • Oxymorphone ER Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource features information on oxymorphone ER, a prescription medication used for the long-term treatment of pain. This page covers safety precautions, abuse potential, and how to take it. A link to more details is also included.
  • Oxymorphone ER Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported oxymorphone ER side effects include drowsiness, constipation, and nausea. This eMedTV segment offers an overview of other possible reactions, listing common ones as well serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Pain With Pancreatic Cancer
    Medication, radiation therapy, and nerve blocks are some methods for relieving pancreatic cancer pain. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at the treatment options for pain associated with this disease.
  • Pamidronate
    Pamidronate is a medication used for treating bone problems or blood calcium problems caused by cancer. This eMedTV article offers a general overview of pamidronate, including information on its effects, dosing guidelines, and possible side effects.
  • Pamidronate Disodium -- Drug Information
    This eMedTV segment gives some basic information on pamidronate disodium, a drug approved for the treatment of bone problems or blood calcium problems caused by cancer. Topics covered include specific uses, warnings, dosing, and more.
  • Pamidronate Dosing
    For the treatment of Paget's disease, the suggested pamidronate dose is 30 mg daily for three days in a row. This eMedTV resource also offers pamidronate dosing recommendations for treating high blood calcium and preventing bone damage due to cancer.
  • Pancreatic Cancer
    Pancreatic cancer is condition where cancerous cells first develop in the pancreas. This eMedTV article provides an overview of the disease, including information about its symptoms and a discussion of its diagnosis and treatment.
  • Pancreatic Cancer Alternative Treatment
    Herbal products, acupuncture, and vitamins are alternatives to standard pancreatic cancer treatments. This eMedTV page examines at these and other alternatives, with a list of questions to ask your healthcare provider when considering such an option.
  • Pancreatic Cancer Causes
    In the case of pancreatic cancer, causes of the disease have not yet been identified. As this eMedTV segment explains, however, researchers have found certain risk factors (such as cigarette smoking) that increase the chances of getting the disease.
  • Pancreatic Cancer Chemotherapy
    As one of the standard treatments for pancreatic cancer, chemotherapy involves the use of anticancer drugs. This eMedTV resource explains how chemotherapy is used to treat this disease and discusses the side effects associated with such treatment.
  • Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosis
    Lab tests, CT scans, and other tests are often used to help diagnose pancreatic cancer. This eMedTV article explains why it can be difficult to diagnose this disease and takes a look at the steps involved in making a diagnosis.
  • Pancreatic Cancer Nutrition
    As this eMedTV page explains, getting proper nutrition during pancreatic cancer treatment is important -- and not always easy. This article discusses the challenges of eating right during and after pancreatic cancer treatment.
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