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Retinoblastoma Research - Stomach Cancer Chemotherapy

This page contains links to eMedTV Cancer Articles containing information on subjects from Retinoblastoma Research to Stomach Cancer Chemotherapy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Retinoblastoma Research
    Research currently is being conducted on new treatments for retinoblastoma. This eMedTV Web page describes the various treatments under investigation and explains the benefits of participating in retinoblastoma research.
  • Retinoblastoma Screening
    At this point, there is no routine, effective retinoblastoma screening test; however, as explained in this eMedTV article, there are tests available to detect the disease in people suspected of having the cancer (or those with risk factors for it).
  • Retinoblastoma Stages
    Retinoblastoma stages used for treatment purposes include intraocular and extraocular. This eMedTV article defines these stages and discusses tests used in the retinoblastoma staging process.
  • Retinoblastoma Support
    For those dealing with retinoblastoma, support from various sources can help them cope with the cancer. This eMedTV segment discusses retinoblastoma support groups and suggests other possible sources of support for help coping with the disease.
  • Retinoblastoma Treatment by Stage
    It's important to know whether the retinoblastoma is intraocular or extraocular when planning treatment. This eMedTV article breaks down retinoblastoma treatment by stage of the disease and provides links to additional information.
  • Retinoblastoma Treatments
    Examples of retinoblastoma treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at the treatment of this condition, including information about side effects, and follow-up care.
  • Retnoblastoma
    This eMedTV page explains that retinoblastoma, a type of eye cancer, typically affects children under the age of five. This page further describes retinoblastoma, including treatment options. Retnoblastoma is a common misspelling of retinoblastoma.
  • Revelimid
    Revlimid is a medication licensed to treat myelodysplastic syndrome and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Revelimid is a common misspelling of Revlimid.
  • Revlamid
    Revlimid is prescribed for the treatment of multiple myeloma and other conditions. This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a look at this prescription drug, including specific uses and dosing instructions. Revlamid is a common misspelling of Revlimid.
  • Revlamide
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, people who have multiple myeloma or myelodysplastic syndrome may benefit from Revlimid. This page covers some dosing guidelines and lists potential side effects. Revlamide is a common misspelling of Revlimid.
  • Revlimid
    Revlimid is used to treat certain bone marrow diseases and cancers. This eMedTV article presents an in-depth look at this medication, with details on specific uses of the drug, dosing instructions, potential side effects, and more.
  • Revlimid and Breastfeeding
    It is probably safest for women to not breastfeed while taking Revlimid (lenalidomide). This eMedTV segment examines this topic in more detail, including whether the drug passes through breast milk and possible complications that could occur.
  • Revlimid and Neuropathy
    It is possible to develop numbness or tingling sensations (neuropathy) while using Revlimid. As this eMedTV page explains, this reaction could lead to serious problems. This article also includes a link to more information on Revlimid's side effects.
  • Revlimid and Pregnancy
    Women should not take Revlimid (lenalidomide) during pregnancy, as it can be quite dangerous. This eMedTV Web page explains the steps women must go through to prevent pregnancy while taking this drug, such as using two forms of birth control.
  • Revlimid Classification
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Revlimid is part of a drug classification known as immunomodulators. This page takes a quick look at how this drug works and offers a link to more details.
  • Revlimid Dangers and Infants
    As a pregnancy Category X drug, Revlimid can cause birth defects or fetal death if used by a pregnant woman. This eMedTV page examines the dangers that can occur in unborn infants when Revlimid is used during pregnancy. It also links to more details.
  • Revlimid Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, Revlimid comes as a capsule and is taken once a day. This page gives detailed information on how your doctor will determine your specific dosage of Revlimid and offers some helpful tips on properly taking this drug.
  • Revlimid Drug Interactions
    Certain products that suppress your immune system may cause dangerous drug interactions with Revlimid. This eMedTV page contains a list of medicines, vaccines, herbal supplements, and other products that you may need to avoid during Revlimid treatment.
  • Revlimid for Myelodysplastic Syndrome
    This eMedTV article explains why Revlimid may be prescribed for people with a bone marrow disease called myelodysplastic syndrome. Potential Revlimid benefits are discussed, as well as a description of what occurs in people with this bone marrow disease.
  • Revlimid Medication Information
    You may receive Revlimid to help slow down the progression of myeloma or myelodysplastic syndrome. This eMedTV page examines Revlimid, with information on how the medication works and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking it.
  • Revlimid Overdose
    This eMedTV resource explains that if you have taken too much Revlimid (lenalidomide), make sure to seek immediate medical attention. This page explains what might occur if someone takes too much of this drug and how an overdose would be treated.
  • Revlimid Rash
    If you are using Revlimid and notice a rash, you may be having an allergic reaction. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, a rash can be a sign of other potentially serious complications, such as a fatal skin reaction.
  • Revlimid Side Effects
    Most people taking Revlimid will develop some type of side effect during treatment. This page of the eMedTV Web site lists common, rare, and potentially dangerous side effects of Revlimid, with statistics on how often problems like these occur.
  • Revlimid Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Revlimid is used for treating multiple myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, and mantle cell lymphoma. This article contains details on what these diseases are and how this drug can help.
  • Revlimid Warnings and Precautions
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Revlimid can increase your risk for infections and should not be used in pregnant women. This page describes other important safety precautions for Revlimid, including warnings for people who should not take this drug.
  • Revlumid
    As this eMedTV article explains, Revlimid is prescribed for delaying the progression of certain bone marrow diseases. This page covers another use of the drug and explains why it is not safe for some people. Revlumid is a common misspelling of Revlimid.
  • Romidepsin
    Romidepsin is a drug used in people who have cutaneous or peripheral T-cell lymphoma. This eMedTV resource examines how this chemotherapy drug works for these particular uses. An overview of possible side effects and safety concerns is also included.
  • Romidepsin Dosage
    Your doctor will need your height and weight when calculating an appropriate amount of romidepsin. This eMedTV page lists other factors that may affect your dose. Some dosing guidelines are also covered, including what to expect when receiving this drug.
  • Romidepsin Drug Information
    Romidepsin is licensed to treat certain types of T-cell lymphoma in adults. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on romidepsin, including how this drug is administered and possible safety issues. A link to more details is also included.
  • Romidepsin Side Effects
    A few of the common romidepsin side effects include nausea, vomiting, and a decreased appetite. This eMedTV resource offers a closer look at other possible reactions and explains how most people taking this drug are likely to develop some type of problem.
  • Salad Dressings
    Creamy dressings very often contain milk or buttermilk, so many (if not most) salad dressings are off-limits if you are strictly avoiding lactose. Your best bets? Italian, oil and vinegar, or Catalina dressings are sometimes lactose-free. Watch for Parmesan cheese as an ingredient in some of these, though.
  • Sancuso
    Sancuso is a prescription medication used to prevent vomiting and nausea due to chemotherapy. This eMedTV article describes the drug in more detail, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and tips on when and how to use it.
  • Sancuso and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if Sancuso (granisetron transdermal) passes through breast milk. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains that no research has been done on Sancuso and breastfeeding, so the potential risks are not clear at this time.
  • Sancuso and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, the FDA classifies Sancuso (granisetron transdermal) as a pregnancy Category B drug, meaning it appears to be safe for use during pregnancy. This page further discusses the results of studies done on Sancuso and pregnancy.
  • Sancuso Dosage
    There is only one standard Sancuso dosage: one patch applied to the skin 24 to 48 hours before chemotherapy. This eMedTV segment provides more detailed dosing guidelines for Sancuso, including information on when and how to apply this skin patch.
  • Sancuso Drug Information
    Sancuso can help prevent nausea and vomiting due to certain types of chemotherapy. This portion of the eMedTV library takes a closer look at Sancuso, with information on how the drug is used and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Sancuso Drug Interactions
    Ketoconazole and phenobarbital may cause negative interactions with Sancuso. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at how these Sancuso drug interactions may decrease the effectiveness of the medicines or increase your risk of side effects.
  • Sancuso Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that a Sancuso (granisetron transdermal) overdose is unlikely, as this medicine comes in the form of a patch. However, this article also discusses when an overdose may occur, the effects it may cause, and how it may be treated.
  • Sancuso Side Effects
    Some of the most common side effects of Sancuso include headaches and constipation. As this eMedTV Web resource explains, although most side effects of this drug are mild, some may require prompt medical attention, such as chest pain or fainting.
  • Sancuso Uses
    Sancuso is primarily used for preventing vomiting and nausea caused by chemotherapy. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses Sancuso uses in more detail, including how the medication works, possible off-label uses, and its use in children.
  • Sancuso Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Sancuso if you have a bowel obstruction or liver disease. This eMedTV Web article explores other important Sancuso warnings and precautions, including information on what to tell your doctor before using this medicine.
  • See a Movie
    Going to a theater for a movie can really help you forget your stresses and responsibilities for a few hours. Enjoy a snack, relax, and immerse yourself in the film. While watching a movie at home can be a nice break, too, there's just something about spending a few hours inside a dark theater that helps you forget your worries for a while.
  • Setuximab
    People with one of two kinds of cancer may be given cetuximab as part of their treatment plan. This eMedTV page lists possible side effects, describes how this drug is given, and links to more information. Setuximab is a common misspelling of cetuximab.
  • Sexual Changes in Men
    In men, chemo can change hormone levels, damage nerves important for getting erections, and decrease blood flow to the penis. Added up, these changes can really dampen your sex life. Also, you may be way too tired (or just not in the mood) for sex. However, make sure you talk to your doctor about whether you and your partner should use birth control (since chemotherapy sometimes damages sperm and causes other problems for a potential pregnancy), for those times when you do feel amorous.
  • Sexual Changes in Women
    In women, chemo can damage the ovaries, essentially putting you into premature menopause. This can cause vaginal dryness, hot flashes, menstrual changes, and decreased sex drive. Fatigue and worry also get in the way of feeling in the mood. If you can still get pregnant, make sure to talk to your doctor about birth control, as pregnancy generally should be avoided during (and for a while after) chemo.
  • Should I Participate in a Cancer Clinical Trial?
    I just heard about a clinical trial for my particular form of cancer -- should I participate? This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at how these studies are done, with info on the pros and cons, questions to ask, and much more.
  • Side Affects of Mercaptopurine
    As this eMedTV article discusses, people taking mercaptopurine are likely to experience some type of side effect, such as nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting. Side affects of mercaptopurine is a common misspelling of side effects of mercaptopurine.
  • Side Effects of Anastrozole
    Some common side effects of anastrozole hot flashes, nausea, and joint pain. This eMedTV resource lists common and rare side effects, as well as side effects that should be reported to your physician right away.
  • Side Effects of Bevacizumab
    Because side effects of bevacizumab are possible, this page from the eMedTV Web site offers a list of the most commonly reported side effects, rare side effects, and side effects that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Cabazitaxel
    Nausea, anemia, and low white blood cells are among the common side effects of cabazitaxel. This eMedTV page explains other common reactions that are likely to occur with this drug, as well as serious side effects that require immediate medical care.
  • Side Effects of Caphosol
    As this eMedTV resource explains, contact your doctor if you are using Caphosol and develop side effects such as swelling of the mouth or difficulty breathing. This article explains how problems with Caphosol are rare and offers a link to more details.
  • Side Effects of Chemotherapy
    With chemotherapy, side effects are understood to be part of the treatment process. This eMedTV page lists several reactions that a person may experience and provides suggestions on what to do if they are a concern. There is also a link to learn more.
  • Side Effects of Chlorambucil
    Vomiting, diarrhea, and mouth sores are possible chlorambucil side effects. As this page from the eMedTV Web site explains, this prescription drug can also cause potentially serious complications that need immediate medical care.
  • Side Effects of Diindolylmethane
    No diindolylmethane side effects have been reported in clinical studies or case reports. As this eMedTV page explains, the lack of reported side effects of diindolylmethane most likely reflects a lack of studies large enough to find side effects.
  • Side Effects of Epirubicin
    Common side effects of epirubicin include anemia, hair loss, and sores in the mouth. As this eMedTV segment explains, some epirubicin side effects are more serious and require medical attention, such as bloody stool, arrhythmia, or allergic reaction.
  • Side Effects of Eribulin
    Nausea, anemia, and low white blood cells are among the common side effects of eribulin. This eMedTV page explains other common reactions that are likely to occur with this drug, as well as serious side effects that require immediate medical care.
  • Side Effects of Exemestane
    Common side effects of exemestane may include insomnia, headaches, and nausea. This eMedTV article describes other common exemestane side effects and lists serious problems that should be reported immediately to a healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Fentanyl Sublingual Spray
    As this eMedTV segment explains, fentanyl sublingual spray can cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and drowsiness. This page highlights many other reactions, including serious problems you should report immediately to your healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Fulvestrant
    Nausea, headaches, and hot flashes are among the common side effects of fulvestrant. This segment of the eMedTV archives lists these and other common side effects, and also explains which side effects may need immediate medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Hydromorphone ER
    Drowsiness, constipation, and nausea are common side effects of hydromorphone ER. This eMedTV Web resource highlights several side effects of this pain medication, including serious problems you should report immediately to your healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Irinotecan Chemo
    When undergoing chemotherapy treatment with irinotecan, most people will develop some type of side effect. This eMedTV page lists some of the possible reactions with this drug, and offers a link to more information on how often these problems occur.
  • Side Effects of Lapatinib
    Fatigue, diarrhea, and nausea are some of the most commonly reported side effects of lapatinib. This eMedTV segment provides a list of other possible side effects, including potentially serious ones that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Letrozole
    Common side effects of letrozole can include dizziness, weight gain, and hot flashes. This eMedTV article also lists some more serious side effects that you should report to your doctor right away (including chest pain and signs of a blood clot).
  • Side Effects of Morphine Sulfate ER
    Some of the common side effects of morphine sulfate ER include dizziness and nausea. This eMedTV page provides an overview of morphine sulfate ER side effects, listing common ones as well as potentially serious ones that require medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Morphine Sulfate/Naltrexone Hydrochloride
    Drowsiness, constipation, and nausea are common side effects of morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride. This eMedTV page lists several side effects of this drug, including serious problems you should report immediately to your healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Pamidronate
    Nausea, fever, and loss of appetite are some of the most commonly reported side effects of pamidronate. This eMedTV segment lists other possible pamidronate side effects, including some potentially serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Propoxyphene Napsylate
    When using propoxyphene napsylate, you may develop nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on side effects of propoxyphene napsylate, including potentially serious problems requiring immediate medical care.
  • Side Effects of Protein-Bound Paclitaxel
    Anemia, hair loss, and nausea are some of the most common side effects of protein-bound paclitaxel. This eMedTV segment offers a more complete list of common side effects and explains which side effects require immediate medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Trastuzumab
    This eMedTV page explains that possible side effects of trastuzumab include headaches and nausea, among other things. This page provides a list of common side effects, as well as side effects that should be reported to your physician right away.
  • Sipuleucel
    This eMedTV resource provides some details on sipuleucel-T, a medication prescribed to help treat metastatic prostate cancer. This page also discusses who can use it and how it works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Sipuleucel Vaccine
    This eMedTV article explains that although sipuleucel-T may be considered a type of vaccine, it does not actually prevent prostate cancer. This page describes how this prescription medicine works and links to more details.
  • Sipuleucel-T
    Available by prescription only, sipuleucel-T is used to treat prostate cancer that has metastasized. This eMedTV article explains how this drug works to help men with prostate cancer live longer, offers dosing guidelines, and lists potential side effects.
  • Sipuleucel-T Dosage
    For the treatment of prostate cancer with sipuleucel-T, the dose is created using a man's own immune cells. This eMedTV page explains how this medication is made for each individual person and offers some guidelines on how it is administered.
  • Sipuleucel-T Medication Information
    If you have prostate cancer that has metastasized, your healthcare provider may recommend sipuleucel-T. This eMedTV article offers some general information on sipuleucel-T, including dosing guidelines for the medication, possible side effects, and more.
  • Sipuleucel-T Side Effects
    Nausea, headaches, and general pain are some of the common side effects of sipuleucel-T. This page from the eMedTV Web library lists other potential reactions to this prescription medicine and explains which problems require immediate medical attention.
  • Skin and Nail Changes
    Chemo targets fast-growing cells, including skin and nail cells. At first, you may notice minor problems, such as a bit of drying, cracking, peeling, and irritation, but symptoms can progress into very serious situations that can cause permanent damage. Take care of your skin (gently) and keep an eye on developing problems.
  • Skin and Nail Problems With Chemotherapy
    It is possible to develop skin and nail problems with chemotherapy. This part of the eMedTV Web site explains why chemotherapy drugs affect the skin and nails, and outlines some suggestions for dealing with nail and skin problems during chemotherapy.
  • Sorafenib
    Sorafenib is a chemotherapy medicine used to treat kidney, liver, or thyroid cancer. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at this medication, including details on its effectiveness during clinical studies, dosing tips, and more.
  • Sorafenib Dosage
    Available in the form of a tablet, sorafenib is usually taken twice daily on an empty stomach. This eMedTV resource examines specific dosing guidelines for sorafenib, with details on how your dosage is determined and tips on how to take this drug.
  • Sorafenib Drug Information
    Sorafenib may be prescribed to treat certain types of liver or kidney cancer. This eMedTV article provides more information on sorafenib, including how to take this drug, possible side effects, and safety concerns. A link to more details is also included.
  • Sorafenib Side Effects
    If you are undergoing chemotherapy with sorafenib, side effects may include a rash, nausea, and fatigue. This eMedTV segment outlines some common reactions that may occur with this medicine, as well as potentially serious problems that may need treatment.
  • Soups
    It's pretty obvious to most people that creamy soups often contain milk, but many other seemingly "safe" soups also contain milk or milk products. Always check the label.
  • Stages of Liver Cancer
    As explained in this eMedTV article, liver cancer staging is used to describe the extent of the disease. The stages of this type of cancer include stages I-IV and recurrent cases of the disease, as well as further classifications for treatment purposes.
  • Stages of Pancreatic Cancer
    As explained in this eMedTV article, pancreatic cancer stages range from 0 through IV, as well as recurrent cases of the disease. This resource defines these stages, which are used to describe the extent of the disease.
  • Stamach Cancer
    This page from the eMedTV site discusses stomach cancer, a disease that occurs when cancer cells first develop in the stomach. This page also describes possible symptoms and treatment options. Stamach cancer is a common misspelling of stomach cancer.
  • Stem Cell Transplant for Multiple Myeloma
    As explained on this eMedTV page, a stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma allows a person to receive high doses of chemotherapy or radiation to treat the cancer. This article discusses this procedure in detail, including potential side effects.
  • Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Revlimid
    As this eMedTV Web selection discusses, people who take Revlimid may develop Stevens-Johnson syndrome, a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. This article describes symptoms of this dangerous problem and how to minimize your risk.
  • Stomach Cancer
    Stomach cancer is a serious disease in which cancer cells first develop in the stomach. This eMedTV article presents an overview of this type of cancer, including information about its symptoms and how the disease is diagnosed and treated.
  • Stomach Cancer Causes
    In the case of stomach cancer, causes of the disease have not yet been found. As explained in this eMedTV segment, researchers have identified factors (such as smoking) that increase a person's chances of developing stomach cancer.
  • Stomach Cancer Chemotherapy
    This eMedTV article describes how chemotherapy is used to treat stomach cancer and explains side effects commonly seen with the treatment. This article also gives an explanation of how the anticancer medicine is administered.
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