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Uterine Sarcoma Cancer - What Is Advanced Cancer?

This page contains links to eMedTV Cancer Articles containing information on subjects from Uterine Sarcoma Cancer to What Is Advanced Cancer?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Uterine Sarcoma Cancer
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, uterine sarcoma is a type of cancer that affects tissues supporting the uterus. This article takes a quick look at common symptoms and includes a link to more in-depth information on this topic.
  • Uterine Sarcoma Stages
    In cases of uterine sarcoma, stages are used to express the extent of the disease. This eMedTV article defines the stages of uterine sarcoma, which include stages I-IV and recurrent cases of the cancer, and looks at tests used in the staging process.
  • Uterine Sarcoma Treatment
    Uterine sarcoma treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and/or hormone therapy. This eMedTV resource describes the various treatments that may be used to treat uterine sarcoma and provides links to additional information.
  • Uterine Sarcoma Treatment by Stage
    For women with uterine sarcoma, treatment is often based on the stage of the disease. This eMedTV Web page breaks down uterine sarcoma treatment by stage of the cancer, from stage I to stage IV and recurrent cases of the disease.
  • Utrine Cancer
    Uterine cancer is a disease that occurs when cancerous cells form in the uterus. This eMedTV segment further describes this type of cancer, including possible risk factors for the disease. Utrine cancer is a common misspelling of uterine cancer.
  • Velcad
    Velcade is a medication licensed to treat multiple myeloma or mantle cell lymphoma in adults. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Velcad is a common misspelling of Velcade.
  • Velcade
    Velcade is a drug used to treat certain cancers that affect the plasma cells or lymphatic system. This eMedTV Web page presents an in-depth look at this prescription medicine, with details on specific uses, how the drug is given, side effects, and more.
  • Velcade and Amyloidosis
    Some people may receive Velcade to treat amyloidosis, although this is an unapproved use of the drug. This eMedTV segment further discusses this "off-label" use, including details on how this prescription medicine works. It also links to more details.
  • Velcade and Breastfeeding
    It is generally advised for women to not breastfeed while receiving Velcade (bortezomib). This eMedTV article presents detailed information on this topic, including whether the drug passes through breast milk and potential problems that might occur.
  • Velcade and Pregnancy
    As examined in this eMedTV article, pregnant women may put their unborn child at risk if they receive Velcade (bortezomib). This page explains why women should use an effective birth control method during Velcade treatment and covers potential problems.
  • Velcade Dosage
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Velcade is given as an injection by your healthcare provider usually once or twice a week. This page gives details on how your specific dosage of Velcade is calculated and what to expect during treatment with this drug.
  • Velcade Dosing Schedule
    As this eMedTV page explains, your doctor will determine an appropriate Velcade dosing schedule for your particular situation based on the condition being treated and many other factors. A more in-depth discussion is provided with links to more details.
  • Velcade Drug Interactions
    Vitamin C, clozapine, and various other products may cause dangerous drug interactions with Velcade. This eMedTV page contains a comprehensive list of supplements, medications, and other substances that you may need to avoid during Velcade treatment.
  • Velcade Leg Weakness
    It is possible to develop potentially serious problems like leg weakness while using Velcade. This eMedTV Web selection describes other possible reactions to this chemotherapy drug, including which problems require immediate medical treatment.
  • Velcade Medication Information
    You may receive Velcade for the treatment of multiple myeloma or mantle cell lymphoma. This eMedTV Web selection examines Velcade, with information on how this prescription medication works, how it is administered, and a link to more details.
  • Velcade Off-Label
    Treating amyloidosis or certain types of T-cell lymphomas are some off-label uses for Velcade. This eMedTV page explores theses unapproved uses and explains how the drug works. This page also offers a link to more details on specific indications.
  • Velcade Overdose
    It can be dangerous and potentially fatal to be given too much Velcade (bortezomib). This eMedTV Web page explains that if you have received an overdose on this medicine, it may cause heart problems or anemia. Treatment options are also discussed.
  • Velcade Regimen
    The Velcade treatment plan your doctor recommends will vary for each person depending on several factors. This eMedTV Web page examines how this chemotherapy regimen is determined, with tips on how Velcade is given and links to more details.
  • Velcade Side Effects
    Some people receiving Velcade may develop serious reactions to this drug, such as seizures or jaundice. This eMedTV article examines common, rare, and potentially dangerous side effects of Velcade, with statistics on how often problems like these occur.
  • Velcade Treatment
    When undergoing Velcade treatment, you may experience weakness, diarrhea, or nausea. This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of this chemotherapy drug, including what it is used for and how it is administered. A link to more details is also included.
  • Velcade Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Velcade is used for treating multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma in adults. This page contains details on what these diseases are and how this chemotherapy medication can help to kill cancer cells.
  • Velcade Warnings and Precautions
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Velcade can increase your risk for infections and may not be safe for pregnant women. This page describes other important safety precautions for Velcade, including warnings for people who should not take this drug.
  • Vemorafenib
    Vemurafenib is a prescription drug used for the treatment of a certain type of skin cancer called melanoma. This eMedTV resource gives a brief overview of the drug, including some of its side effects. Vemorafenib is a common misspelling of vemurafenib.
  • Vemurafenib
    Vemurafenib is a medication that can help slow down the progression of a certain type of skin cancer. This eMedTV page explains how this drug works to slow down abnormal cell growth, offers dosing tips, lists possible side effects, and more.
  • Vemurafenib Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, your specific dose of vemurafenib can depend on how well you tolerate the drug and if you develop any side effects. This page covers dosing guidelines for this drug, including a list of tips for taking it.
  • Vemurafenib Drug Information
    This eMedTV page provides information on vemurafenib, a drug prescribed to treat a certain type of skin cancer in adults. This article gives an overview of how to take this medication, how it works, and more. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Vemurafenib Side Effects
    Seek medical attention if you are taking vemurafenib and you develop blurred vision or breathing problems. This eMedTV page outlines the side effects that occurred during vemurafenib clinical trials, with details on which problems may need medical care.
  • Venorelbine
    Adults who have non-small cell lung cancer may receive chemotherapy treatment with vinorelbine. This eMedTV selection briefly describes this medication and how it is administered. Venorelbine is a common misspelling of vinorelbine.
  • Vincasar PFS
    Vincasar PFS is a chemotherapy drug approved to treat a certain type of leukemia. This eMedTV segment contains more details on this prescription drug, with information on dosing instructions, details on how it works, and potential side effects.
  • Vincasar PFS and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV segment explains why women are generally advised to not breastfeed while receiving Vincasar PFS (vincristine), as potentially serious reactions might occur in a nursing infant. This page describes the complications that could occur.
  • Vincasar PFS and Pregnancy
    As discussed in this eMedTV Web page, an unborn child may be harmed if a woman takes Vincasar PFS (vincristine) during pregnancy. This article describes some of the problems that occurred during animal studies on this chemotherapy medication.
  • Vincasar PFS Chemotherapy Information
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Vincasar PFS is a drug used to treat acute leukemia in adults, children, and infants. This page covers more information on this chemotherapy drug and describes safety issues to be aware of while using Vincasar PFS.
  • Vincasar PFS Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, your dose of Vincasar PFS will be determined based on a number of factors, such as how you respond to the drug and other medical conditions you may have. More specific dosing guidelines are provided in this article.
  • Vincasar PFS Drug Interactions
    FluMist, digoxin, and various other products can react with Vincasar PFS. This eMedTV resource examines how drug interactions with Vincasar PFS may lead to dangerous complications. It also explores some of the ways to avoid these problems.
  • Vincasar PFS Overdose
    This eMedTV Web selection offers a discussion on whether an overdose on Vincasar PFS (vincristine) would cause dangerous problems. This resource lists the complications that might result and explains how these symptoms may be treated.
  • Vincasar PFS Side Effects
    As this eMedTV resource explains, serious Vincasar PFS side effects include seizures, vision changes, and unusual bleeding. This page offers a more in-depth list of reactions to this chemotherapy drug and explains which problems require urgent treatment.
  • Vincasar PFS Uses
    Vincasar PFS is prescribed to slow down the progression of a certain type of leukemia. This eMedTV resource presents details on what Vincasar PFS is used for, how it works to slow down the progression of the cancer, and whether it's safe for children.
  • Vincasar PFS Warnings and Precautions
    Vincasar PFS may cause lung problems or low blood cell counts. This part of the eMedTV Web library explores other important safety precautions to be aware of with Vincasar PFS, including warnings for those who should avoid using this chemotherapy drug.
  • Vinorelbine
    Vinorelbine helps treat a certain type of lung cancer by interfering with how cancer cells divide. This eMedTV selection contains an overview of this drug, including what it is prescribed for, how it is administered, and links to more details.
  • Vinorelbine Brand Name
    As this eMedTV article discusses, vinorelbine is sold under the brand name Navelbine. This resource takes a closer look at who makes this product and the strengths that are available. It also provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Vinorelbine Dosage
    This eMedTV article outlines specific dosing guidelines for vinorelbine, including how the amount you receive is calculated, how often it is given, and how long treatment will last. This page also covers some details on how this injection is administered.
  • Vinorelbine Drug Information
    If you have non-small cell lung cancer, your healthcare provider may prescribe vinorelbine. This eMedTV Web selection contains more information on vinorelbine, including how this drug is given, safety precautions, and more.
  • Vinorelbine Indications
    Adults who have a certain type of lung cancer may receive chemotherapy treatment with vinorelbine. This eMedTV segment discusses other indications (uses) for vinorelbine, including some unapproved reasons to use this prescription medicine.
  • Vinorelbine Side Effects
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, vinorelbine may cause hair loss, fatigue, and vomiting. This resource takes a detailed look at some of the other possible side effects of vinorelbine and explains which problems require urgent medical treatment.
  • Vinorelbine Tartrate
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, vinorelbine tartrate is prescribed to treat non-small cell lung cancer in adults. This article examines how this medication works, how it is given, and possible side effects. It also links to more details.
  • Vismodegib
    Vismodegib is a prescription medication used to treat certain cases of basal cell carcinoma. This eMedTV Web selection presents more detailed information on this medicine, including how to take it, how it works, important safety precautions, and more.
  • Vismodegib Dosage
    The standard dose of vismodegib is 150 mg taken once daily to treat basal cell carcinoma. This eMedTV resource provides a closer look at dosing guidelines for this drug, including how long your treatment will last and tips for taking these capsules.
  • Vismodegib Drug Information
    This eMedTV page explains that people with basal cell carcinoma may be treated with a drug called vismodegib. More information on this medicine is included in this article, including how it works and safety issues. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Vismodegib Side Effects
    As this eMedTV resource explains, people taking vismodegib are likely to develop some type of reaction to the drug, such as hair loss, vomiting, or fatigue. This page lists other vismodegib side effects, including serious ones that need treatment.
  • Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia
    Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia is a type of cancer that develops in plasma cells. This eMedTV segment briefly discusses this condition, explains how this rare form of cancer is diagnosed and treated, and includes a link to more information.
  • Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia
    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia is a rare form of cancer that begins in plasma cells. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, including information about its symptoms and treatment options for the disease.
  • Water Retention
    Chemo can sometimes cause water retention. Keep an eye on this potential problem by weighing yourself daily to watch for any large jumps in your weight. Water retention isn't just a minor cosmetic problem; it can put so much stress on your heart that you can go into heart failure.
  • What Are Histrelin Implants Used For?
    As this eMedTV page explains, histrelin implants are used for treating late-stage prostate cancer in men and puberty that has started too soon in children. This page explains how this prescription drug works and describes possible off-label uses.
  • What Are the Signs That a Mole Could Be Skin Cancer?
    If you're worried that one of your moles is cancerous, check out this eMedTV article. In this resource, we take a quick look at the signs that point to your mole being cancerous, such as if it has a diameter larger than a pencil eraser.
  • What Could Happen If Thalidomide Was Taken While Pregnant?
    This eMedTV segment explains what kinds of problems could happen if thalidomide were taken by a woman while pregnant, such as birth defects and fetal death. This page also provides a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • What Do the Different Stages of Cancer Mean?
    In this part of the eMedTV site, we talk about what the different stages of cancer mean. We also explain why staging is a useful tool in your treatment plan and how different types of cancer may have different staging systems.
  • What Everybody Ought to Know About Cancer Treatment Scams
    Unfortunately, some treatments for cancer are scams and may do nothing for your condition. This eMedTV segment lists the top five warning signs of such scams and talks about what to keep in mind with money-back guarantees and customer reviews.
  • What Happens During ERCP With Balloon Dilation and Stent?
    This video clip describes an ERCP with balloon dilation procedure.
  • What If You Don't Have a Laparascopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy?
    This video clip explains the risks of not having the procedure.
  • What If You Don't Have the ERCP With Balloon Dilation?
    This video explains what to expect if you choose not to have the ERCP procedure.
  • What Is 6-MP Used to Treat?
    Mercaptopurine (6-MP) is used to help slow down the progression of a cancer called acute lymphatic leukemia. This eMedTV Web resource takes a brief look at what 6-MP is used to treat and how it works. It also links to more detailed information.
  • What Is a "Normal" Tumor Marker Number for Testicular Cancer?
    Looking for info about the tumor markers used for testicular cancer? This eMedTV resource can help. It tells you what you need to know about the three tumor markers normally used for this type of cancer, including the "normal" ranges for each one.
  • What Is a Chemotherapy Port and How Do They Attach It?
    As you'll see in this part of the eMedTV site, chemotherapy ports have their advantages and disadvantages. To get the answers you're looking for, check out this quick article. It gives an overview of what chemotherapy ports are and how they are attached.
  • What Is a Colostomy?
    If you have questions about what a colostomy is, check out this part of the eMedTV site. It features an overview of how this surgical procedure is performed, what it does, and how to make the transition as easy as possible.
  • What Is Abiraterone Used For?
    As this eMedTV page explains, abiraterone is used for treating late-stage prostate cancer. This page explains how this prescription drug works to slow down the spread of cancer cells and describes some possible unapproved uses for this product.
  • What Is Acetaminophen and Pentazocine Used For?
    As this eMedTV segment explains, acetaminophen and pentazocine is used for the treatment of mild-to-moderate pain. This page examines how this pain reliever works and who it is designed for. It also discusses whether there are off-label uses.
  • What Is Actiq?
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Actiq to treat breakthrough pain in people who have cancer. This eMedTV Web page further discusses what Actiq is, how it works, and some of its effects on the body. A link to more details is also provided.
  • What Is Advanced Cancer?
    As you'll see in this eMedTV article, the term "advanced cancer" doesn't mean the same thing to everyone. To help clarify, this page explains what advanced cancer is and talks about the other types of cancer it is often confused with.
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